Borsley & Kathol (2000) : Différence entre versions

De Arbres
Aller à : Navigation, rechercher
 
Ligne 2 : Ligne 2 :
  
  
   Breton has [[VSO]] order in subordinate clauses and in some [[main clauses]], but it does not normally allow a finite verb in initial position in main clauses, which instead show [[V2]] order. We investigate Breton [[V2]] structures and argue that they are problematic for transformational assumptions. We show that a more satisfactory account is possible within an extension of HPSG, which distinguishes between [[constituent]] structure and linear structure.
+
   '''Abstract''':
 +
 
 +
  "Breton has [[VSO]] order in subordinate clauses and in some [[main clauses]], but it does not normally allow a finite verb in initial position in main clauses, which instead show [[V2]] order. We investigate Breton [[V2]] structures and argue that they are problematic for transformational assumptions. We show that a more satisfactory account is possible within an extension of HPSG, which distinguishes between [[constituent]] structure and linear structure."
 +
 
 +
 
 +
=== à propos ===
 +
 
 +
R. Borsley a été l'éditeur de [[Rivero (2000)]] paru la même année, qui proposait que le long mouvement de tête en breton était une condition d'interface à [[PF]].
 +
 
 +
 
 +
* [[Rivero (2000)|Rivero, M.L. 2000]]. 'Finiteness and Second Position in Long Verb Movement Languages: Breton and Slavic.', R. Borsley (éd.), ''The Nature and Function of Syntactic Categories'', ''Syntax and Semantics'' 32, Academic Press, N.Y., 295-323.
  
  
 
[[Category:ouvrages de recherche|Categories]]
 
[[Category:ouvrages de recherche|Categories]]

Version actuelle en date du 15 septembre 2019 à 11:29

  • Borsley, Robert & Kathol, Andreas, 2000. 'Breton as a V2 language', Linguistics 38/4:665-710.


 Abstract:
 
 "Breton has VSO order in subordinate clauses and in some main clauses, but it does not normally allow a finite verb in initial position in main clauses, which instead show V2 order. We investigate Breton V2 structures and argue that they are problematic for transformational assumptions. We show that a more satisfactory account is possible within an extension of HPSG, which distinguishes between constituent structure and linear structure."


à propos

R. Borsley a été l'éditeur de Rivero (2000) paru la même année, qui proposait que le long mouvement de tête en breton était une condition d'interface à PF.


  • Rivero, M.L. 2000. 'Finiteness and Second Position in Long Verb Movement Languages: Breton and Slavic.', R. Borsley (éd.), The Nature and Function of Syntactic Categories, Syntax and Semantics 32, Academic Press, N.Y., 295-323.